In celebration of Women’s History Month, we’re excited to highlight the incredible accomplishments of a handful of iconic women who changed the face of entertainment. These women, all from different time periods and generations, defied gender, racial, and identity norms to succeed in the face of opposition. They had the guts to put their own careers at risk for what they believed it, and in doing so made history with their boldness!

Last week we paid tribute to the First Lady of Comedy, Lucille Ball, and today we’re highlighting the amazing Mary Tyler Moore (don’t accuse us of having a thing for redheads, we promise we’ll be featuring more amazing non-redheaded women in the coming weeks)!

A young Moore.
A young Moore.

Mary Tyler Moore pushed boundaries throughout her career—through her tenacity and her can-do attitude—but also through her fashion choices. Though some may argue that fashion is just a superficial pursuit, throughout history we’ve seen just how fashion can push and change the status quo. How we dress directly impacts how the world sees us, and fashion works as a silent signifier often times telling others who we are, and where we come from. Mary Tyler Moore caused quite an uproar when she became the first woman to wear pants on TV! Starring as Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show, she insisted that it was more realistic for her character to wear capri pants instead of dresses. Tight capris became her signature look, and women across America felt emboldened to start wearing the pants in the family!

But Mary Tyler Moore did so much more than just start a fashion craze. Through her work starring in The Mary Tyler Moore Show, she also changed the way people perceived women in the workplace. Her portrayal of television producer Mary Richards, was one of the first times a successful, single woman was shown on television. She also served as a producer on the show through the company she co-owned with her husband Grant Tinker, MTM Enterprises. The Mary Tyler Moore Show became a full blown cultural phenomenon, which garnered Moore three Emmys over the years.

Moore (R) talking shop with Betty Ford and Ed Weinberger at the Adams Hotel in 1975.
Moore (R) talking shop with Betty Ford and Ed Weinberger at the Adams Hotel in 1975.

Even with her passing in January, Moore’s light still shines brightly! We hope that younger generations continue to discover the magic that was Mary Tyler Moore.

Stay tuned for next week’s post, where we’ll highlight another incredible entertainment force in celebration of Women’s History Month!

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